Journal cover Journal topic
Weather and Climate Dynamics An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Abstracted/indexed

Abstracted/indexed
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2020-15
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-2020-15
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  30 Apr 2020

30 Apr 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal WCD.

The effect of seasonally and spatially varying chlorophyll on Bay of Bengal surface ocean properties and the South Asian Monsoon

Jack Giddings1, Adrian J. Matthews2, Nicholas P. Klingaman3, Karen J. Heywood1, Manoj Joshi1, and Benjamin G. M. Webber1 Jack Giddings et al.
  • 1Centre for Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK
  • 2Centre for Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, School of Environmental Sciences and School of Mathematics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK
  • 3National Centre for Atmospheric Science–Climate and Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, RG6 6BB, UK

Abstract. Chlorophyll absorbs solar radiation in the upper ocean, increasing mixed-layer radiative heating and sea surface temperatures (SST). The solar absorption caused by chlorophyll can be parameterised as an optical parameter, h2, the scale depth of absorption of blue light. Seasonally and spatially varying h2 in the Bay of Bengal was imposed in a coupled ocean-atmosphere model to investigate the effect of chlorophyll distributions on regional SST, atmospheric circulation and precipitation. There are both direct local upper-ocean effects, through changes in solar radiation absorption and indirect remote atmospheric responses. The depth of the mixed layer relative to the perturbed solar penetration depths modulates the response of SST to chlorophyll. The largest SST response to chlorophyll forcing occurs in coastal regions, where chlorophyll concentrations are high (> 1 mg m−3), and when climatological mixed layer depths shoal during the intermonsoon periods. Precipitation increases significantly by up to 3 mm day−1 across coastal Myanmar during the southwest monsoon onset and over northeast India and Bangladesh during the Autumn intermonsoon period, decreasing model biases.

Jack Giddings et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Login for Authors/Co-Editors] [Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Jack Giddings et al.

Jack Giddings et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 415 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
275 96 44 415 40 41
  • HTML: 275
  • PDF: 96
  • XML: 44
  • Total: 415
  • BibTeX: 40
  • EndNote: 41
Views and downloads (calculated since 30 Apr 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 30 Apr 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 317 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 317 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 24 Sep 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation