Articles | Volume 1, issue 1
Weather Clim. Dynam., 1, 27–44, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-1-27-2020
Weather Clim. Dynam., 1, 27–44, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-1-27-2020

Research article 04 Feb 2020

Research article | 04 Feb 2020

Extratropical-cyclone-induced sea surface temperature anomalies in the 2013–2014 winter

Helen F. Dacre et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Helen Dacre on behalf of the Authors (20 Dec 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (08 Jan 2020) by Shira Raveh-Rubin
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (11 Jan 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (15 Jan 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Jan 2020) by Shira Raveh-Rubin
AR by Helen Dacre on behalf of the Authors (24 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (26 Jan 2020) by Shira Raveh-Rubin
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Short summary
The 2013–2014 winter sea surface temperature (SST) was anomalously cool in the mid-North Atlantic region. We investigate the processes by which cyclones can lead to SST cooling and their contribution towards the 2013–2014 SST anomaly. We find that cyclones induce a cold wake, which extends along the cyclones' cold front. Cyclones account for over 40 % of the observed cooling in the mid-North Atlantic. Thus, cyclones play a major role in determining the extreme 2013–2014 winter SST cooling.