Articles | Volume 1, issue 1
Weather Clim. Dynam., 1, 175–189, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-1-175-2020
Weather Clim. Dynam., 1, 175–189, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-1-175-2020

Research article 23 Apr 2020

Research article | 23 Apr 2020

Front–orography interactions during landfall of the 1992 New Year's Day Storm

Clemens Spensberger and Sebastian Schemm

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Clemens Spensberger on behalf of the Authors (21 Feb 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Mar 2020) by Silvio Davolio
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (05 Mar 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (21 Mar 2020)
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (24 Mar 2020) by Silvio Davolio
AR by Clemens Spensberger on behalf of the Authors (26 Mar 2020)  Author's response
ED: Publish as is (07 Apr 2020) by Silvio Davolio
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Short summary
In this paper, we take a second look at the development of an intense storm that made landfall in Norway a few hours into the new year of 1992, focussing on the effect of the Scandinavian mountains on the storm. We find that the cyclone core evolves largely unaffected, although both the warm and the cold fronts decay rapidly while passing over the mountains. This result suggests that the fronts of a cyclone can become detached from their cyclone core as part of the cyclone’s occlusion process.