Articles | Volume 1, issue 2
Weather Clim. Dynam., 1, 731–744, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-1-731-2020
Weather Clim. Dynam., 1, 731–744, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-1-731-2020

Research article 30 Nov 2020

Research article | 30 Nov 2020

Impacts of the North Atlantic Oscillation on winter precipitations and storm track variability in southeast Canada and the northeast United States

Julien Chartrand and Francesco S. R. Pausata

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Status: closed
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Julien Chartrand on behalf of the Authors (10 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (13 Oct 2020) by Lukas Papritz
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (23 Oct 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (02 Nov 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (06 Nov 2020) by Lukas Papritz
AR by Julien Chartrand on behalf of the Authors (16 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (18 Nov 2020) by Lukas Papritz
AR by Julien Chartrand on behalf of the Authors (18 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
This study explores the relationship between the North Atlantic Oscillation and the winter climate of eastern North America using reanalysis data. Results show that negative phases are linked with an increase in frequency of winter storms developing on the east coast of the United States, resulting in much heavier snowfall over the eastern United States. On the contrary, an increase in cyclone activity over southeastern Canada results in slightly heavier precipitation during positive phases.