Articles | Volume 3, issue 2
Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 471–482, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-471-2022
Weather Clim. Dynam., 3, 471–482, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/wcd-3-471-2022
Research article
13 Apr 2022
Research article | 13 Apr 2022

Extreme Atlantic hurricane seasons made twice as likely by ocean warming

Peter Pfleiderer et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on wcd-2021-64', Anonymous Referee #1, 10 Nov 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Peter Pfleiderer, 16 Dec 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on wcd-2021-64', Anonymous Referee #2, 12 Nov 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Peter Pfleiderer, 16 Dec 2021

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Peter Pfleiderer on behalf of the Authors (27 Jan 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Jan 2022) by Peter Knippertz
RR by Jill Trepanier (02 Feb 2022)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (12 Feb 2022)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (14 Feb 2022) by Peter Knippertz
AR by Peter Pfleiderer on behalf of the Authors (22 Feb 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Feb 2022) by Peter Knippertz
AR by Peter Pfleiderer on behalf of the Authors (03 Mar 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Tropical cyclones are amongst the most dangerous weather events. Here we develop an empirical model that allows us to estimate the number and strengths of tropical cyclones for given atmospheric conditions and sea surface temperatures. An application of the model shows that atmospheric circulation is the dominant factor for seasonal tropical cyclone activity. However, warming sea surface temperatures have doubled the likelihood of extremely active hurricane seasons in the past decades.